April202014

totnoaa asked: Its not really an ask, but still.. I can see that you really love animals and care about them, but i don't know I still feel conflicted with what you do..I work at a wild animals hospital which our purpose is to take care of wild animals and bring them back to the wild.I really believe wild animals belong to the wild, and falconry isn't really my thing lets say that this way haha (against it). But probably it doesn't really matter, cause you will keep doing what you love and I'm nobody to you:)

There is no reason to be against falconry… and I have to say I am surprised that a wildlife rehabilitator would feel that way (falconers have been critical to several rehabilitation facilities). Falconers are beneficial in endless ways; not just for wild birds, but in conservation, rehabilitation, environmental education, pest control, cultural enhancement, and more. Your comment in particular, “I really believe wild animals belong in the wild,” is a pointless worry. Those who take raptor from the wild, like myself, return them in a year or two as a stronger, smarter, more experienced animal. Those who take them as nestlings guarantee them a fat and happy life; nestlings that remain have a 75% chance of death within the first year.

I could sit here and write ten pages of why it is flat out silly to be against falconry, and I have, but there is no sense in repeating it here. If you (or any of my followers) would like more information, I would be happy to send you an essay I wrote a few months ago that outlines why falconry is not only not harmful, but wholly beneficial in several aspects. :)

P.S.- You are not nobody to me. Opinions matter. It is just heartbreaking to me that many people have ill-informed opinions… if you are still against falconry after hearing all of the arguments for it, then that is fine. But please give falconry more than a passing glance before initiating judgement.

April172014

zacharge asked: Interesting garter (Thamnophis sirtalis)- in regards to the subspecies, where was this found (nothing specific, county and state). Looks like it could be a blue phase of Thamnophis sirtalis infernalis California red-sided if you found this in the San Francisco Bay Area or a blue phase Red-spotted Garter Thamnophis sirtalis concinnus. Excellent find.

Ohh! You obviously know much more about snakes than I do. This one was found in northwestern Oregon in an agricultural field. We saw a few more with the same colors nearby. I have not seen any with the bluish color further south.

8AM
8AM
April162014
April132014
April122014
2PM
Borax Lake with the Steens Mountains in the Distance. Eastern Oregon.

Borax Lake with the Steens Mountains in the Distance. Eastern Oregon.

2PM
A sure sign that you’ve found a flock of birders…

A sure sign that you’ve found a flock of birders…

2PM
Red-winged Blackbird, a common migrant on the west coast.

Red-winged Blackbird, a common migrant on the west coast.

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